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Long-lasting effects of relative age at school

Author

Listed:
  • Lionel Page
  • Dipanwita Sarkar
  • Juliana Silva-Goncalves

Abstract

We investigate the long lasting effects on behaviour of relative age at school. We conduct an online incentivised survey with a sample of 1007 adults, who were born at most two months before or after the school entry cut-off date in four Australian states. We find those who were among the oldest in the classroom throughout their school years display higher self-con fidence, are more willing to enter in some form of competition, declare taking more risk in a range of domains in their life and are more trusting of other people, compared to those who were among the youngest.

Suggested Citation

  • Lionel Page & Dipanwita Sarkar & Juliana Silva-Goncalves, 2018. "Long-lasting effects of relative age at school," QuBE Working Papers 056, QUT Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:qut:qubewp:wp056
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Relative age; education; behavioural traits; online experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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