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Floods and Farmers: Evidence from the Field in Thailand

Author

Listed:
  • Sommarat Chantarat

    (Bank of Thailand)

  • Sirikarn Lertamphainont

    (Australian National University)

  • Krislert Samphantharak

    (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract

This paper studies the impacts of the 2011 flood on preferences, subjective expectations, and behavioral choices among Thai rice-farming households. Our results show that experiencing the 2011 flood made farming households more risk averse, more impatient, and more altruistic, and that asset-poor farming households were more likely to be affected by the flood than better-off households. The flood also made households adjust upward their subjective expectations of future severe floods. After being hit by the 2011 flood, households lost their confidence in social safety nets, signifying the limitations of risk-sharing in the presence of covariate shocks. Middle-income households who were not prone to floods had higher expectations of public insurance following the flood. Mediating through the changes of preferences and subjective expectations, the flooded households were less likely to save money and engage in self-insurance mechanisms, as well as to invest in productive investments, but more likely to take out commercial crop insurance, especially those in the bottom and middle wealth groups. These findings shed light on the design of incentivecompatible safety nets and development interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Sommarat Chantarat & Sirikarn Lertamphainont & Krislert Samphantharak, 2016. "Floods and Farmers: Evidence from the Field in Thailand," PIER Discussion Papers 40., Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Aug 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:pui:dpaper:40.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhuldyz Ashikbayeva & Marei Fürstenberg & Timo Kapelari & Albert Pierres & Stephan Thies, 2020. "Household level effects of flooding: Evidence from Thailand," TVSEP Working Papers wp-022, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics, Project TVSEP.
    2. Chantarat, Sommarat & Oum, Sothea & Samphantharak, Krislert & Sann, Vathana, 2019. "Natural Disasters, Preferences, and Behaviors: Evidence from the 2011 Mega Flood in Cambodia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 44-74.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Flood; Farming Households; Preferences; Subjective Expectation; Insurance; Adaptation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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