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Poverty in Kagera, Tanzania: Characteristics, Causes and Constraints

  • Julie Litchfield

    ()

  • Thomas McGregor

    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

This paper analyses the determinants of household welfare in the Northwest region of Tanzania using microlevel cross section data. Despite having gone through a series of structural adjustment programs in the late-1980s, Tanzania is still considered one of the poorest countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The paper argues that the determinants of household welfare are numerous and complex, ranging from individual and household to community and social characteristics, but that the relative importance of these factors varies across the welfare distribution. Using quantile regressions, we find that human, social and physical capital all play a significant role in improving households’ living standards, but that the relatively poor are harmed more by weather shocks because they face more constraints in diversifying out of agriculture. Our results also reveal subtle insights into the relationships between gender and poverty.

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File URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/wps/wp42.pdf
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Paper provided by Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex in its series PRUS Working Papers with number 42.

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Length: 47
Date of creation: Aug 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:42
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Social Sciences and Cultural Studies, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SN
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Web page: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/
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  12. Atkinson, A B, 1987. "On the Measurement of Poverty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 749-64, July.
  13. Minot, Nicholas & Baulch, Bob & Epperecht, Michael, 2006. "Poverty and inequality in Vietnam: spatial patterns and geographic determinants," Research reports 148, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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  15. Ferreira, Luisa, 1996. "Poverty and inequality during structural adjustment in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1641, The World Bank.
  16. Elizabeth Frankenberg & Duncan Thomas & Kathleen Beegle, 1999. "The Real Costs of Indonesian Economic Crisis: Preliminary Findings from the Indonesia Family Life Surveys," Working Papers 99-04, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
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