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Girl Farm Labour And Double-Shift Schooling In The Gambia: The Paradox Of Development Intervention

  • Pamela Kea

    ()

    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

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    This article examines the intensification of Gambian girls’ domestic and farm labour contributions as a result of the introduction of double-shift schooling. Drawing on fieldwork among female farmers and their daughters in Brikama the article puts forth the following arguments: double shift schooling facilitates the intensification and increased appropriation of surplus value from girls’ household and farm labour because girls are more readily able to meet gendered labour obligations that are central to the moral economy of the household and to the demands of agrarian production; secondly, double shift schooling highlights the paradoxical nature of development intervention where, on the one hand, legislation and policy call for a reduction in child labour by increasing access to school and, on the other, neo-liberal educational policy serves to facilitate the intensification of girls’ domestic and farm labour. It maintains that the intensification of girls’ work must be placed within a wider context where children’s, particularly girls’ cheap, flexible and/or unremunerated labour is central to the functioning of local and global processes of accumulation.

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    File URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/wps/wp39.pdf
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    Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Sussex in its series Working Paper Series with number 39.

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    Length: 36
    Date of creation: Oct 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:39
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    Web page: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/economics
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    1. J. E. Stiglitz, 1999. "Introduction," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 28(3), pages 249-254, November.
    2. Beneria, Lourdes, 1979. "Reproduction, Production and the Sexual Division of Labour," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 203-25, September.
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