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Productivity And Firm Heterogeneity In Chile

  • Crespi, G.


    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

We analyze productivity growth in Chilean manufacturing 1979-2000 using the newly available panel of establishments drawn from the Census of Manufacturing. We examine the contribution to productivity growth of ?internal? restructuring (such as new technology and organizational change among survivors) and ?external? restructuring (exit, entry and market share change). We find that (a) ?external restructuring? accounts for 52% of industry labour productivity growth and 57% of industry TFP growth; (b) much of the external restructuring effect comes from the closing down of poorly-performing plants due to import penetration, and (c) import penetration is also an important determinant of internal restructuring in the long term.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Sussex in its series Working Paper Series with number 36.

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Length: 60 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:36
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  1. Timmer, Marcel P. & Szirmai, Adam, 2000. "Productivity growth in Asian manufacturing: the structural bonus hypothesis examined," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 371-392, December.
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  4. Richard Disney & Jonathan Haskel & Ylva Heden, 2003. "Restructuring and productivity growth in uk manufacturing," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(489), pages 666-694, 07.
  5. Jaan Masso & Raul Eamets & Kaia Philips, 2004. "Firm Demographics And Productivity Dynamics In Estonia," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 25, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
  6. George S Olley & Ariel Pakes, 1992. "The Dynamics Of Productivity In The Telecommunications Equipment Industry," Working Papers 92-2, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  7. Bee Yan Aw & Sukkyun Chung & Mark J. Roberts, 2002. "Productivity, Output, and Failure: A Comparison of Taiwanese and Korean Manufacturers," NBER Working Papers 8766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Huggett, Mark & Ospina, Sandra, 2001. "Does productivity growth fall after the adoption of new technology?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 173-195, August.
  9. Levinsohn, J. & Petrin, A., 1999. "When Industries Become More Productive, Do Firms?: Investigating Productivity Dynamics," Working Papers 445, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  10. John Haltiwanger, 1997. "Measuring and analyzing aggregate fluctuations: the importance of building from microeconomic evidence," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 55-78.
  11. Jeremy Greenwood & Boyan Jovanovic, 2001. "Accounting for Growth," NBER Chapters, in: New Developments in Productivity Analysis, pages 179-224 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Tor Jakob Klette & Frode Johansen, 1996. "Accumulation of R&D Capital and Dynamic Firm Performance: A Not-so-fixed Effect Model," Discussion Papers 184, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  13. David H. Good & M. Ishaq Nadiri & Robin C. Sickles, 1996. "Index Number and Factor Demand Approaches to the Estimation of Productivity," NBER Working Papers 5790, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Aw, Bee Yan & Chen, Xiaomin & Roberts, Mark J., 2001. "Firm-level evidence on productivity differentials and turnover in Taiwanese manufacturing," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 51-86, October.
  15. Griliches, Zvi & Regev, Haim, 1995. "Firm productivity in Israeli industry 1979-1988," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 175-203, January.
  16. Jenkins, Stephen P, 1995. "Easy Estimation Methods for Discrete-Time Duration Models," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 129-38, February.
  17. Harberger, Arnold C, 1998. "A Vision of the Growth Process," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 1-32, March.
  18. Ahn, Sanghoon, 2003. "Technology Upgrading with Learning Cost," CEI Working Paper Series 2003-21, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
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