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Multidimensional Inequality: An Empirial Application to Brazil

  • Patricia Justino

    ()

    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

  • Julie Litchfield

    ()

    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, Department of Economics, Universtity of Sussex)

  • Yoko Niimi

    ()

    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex)

This paper illustrates two empirical approaches to the measurement of multidimensional inequality. The first approach is based on the analysis of the independent distribution of monetary and nonmonetary welfare attributes. The second approach considers pair-wise joint distributions of those attributes, hence allowing for differences in the various distributions, as well as possible correlations between the attributes. The analysis is based on household survey data from Brazil for 1996. We focus on inequalities in income, education, health and political participation outcomes. We calculate the extent of vertical and horizontal monetary and non-monetary inequalities, examine the determinants of both types of inequality and analyse their impact on household welfare. Our results show that economic analyses based solely on the distribution of income variables will not portray fully the degree of socio-economic and political inequalities in Brazil. In fact, traditional analysis of inequality may overestimate the extent of inequality, as education and other non-monetary welfare attributes appear to be more equally distributed in Brazil than income.

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Paper provided by Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex in its series PRUS Working Papers with number 24.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: May 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:24
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Social Sciences and Cultural Studies, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SN
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