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Modern Models of Monopsony in Labor Markets: A Brief Survey

  • Orley C. Ashenfelter

    (Princeton University)

  • Henry Farber

    (Princeton University)

  • Michael R. Ransom

    (Brigham Young University)

There has been a renewed interest in monopsony in labor markets in recent years that includes both the traditional static approach to monopsony, ably reviewed by Boal and Ransom (1997) and the new'' approach to monopsony with more attention paid to dynamic issues, developed in detail by Manning (2003). The papers presented in this supplement highlight both approaches and illustrate the range of labor market settings in which the exercise of monopsony power may be important.

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File URL: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01736664510
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Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. in its series Working Papers with number 1223.

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Date of creation: Apr 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:dsp01736664510
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  1. Jeremy T. Fox, 2009. "Estimating the Employer Switching Costs and Wage Responses of Forward-Looking Engineers," NBER Working Papers 15322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Torberg Falch, 2010. "The Elasticity of Labor Supply at the Establishment Level," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 237-266, 04.
  3. Michael R Ransom & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2010. "New Market Power Models and Sex Differences in Pay," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 267-289, 04.
  4. Parsons, Donald O, 1972. "Specific Human Capital: An Application to Quit Rates and Layoff Rates," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(6), pages 1120-43, Nov.-Dec..
  5. Suresh Naidu, 2010. "Recruitment Restrictions and Labor Markets: Evidence from the Postbellum U.S. South," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 413-445, 04.
  6. George Karatzas, 2009. "On the origin and the literal meaning of monopsony: a note," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 56(4), pages 425-430, December.
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