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Child Health and Economic Crisis in Peru

  • Christina Paxson

    (Princeton University)

  • Norbert Schady

    (World Bank)

The effect of macroeconomic crises on child health is a topic of great policy importance. We use data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to analyze the impact of a profound crisis in Peru on infant mortality. We show that there was an increase in the infant mortality rate of about 2.5 percentage points for children born during the crisis, implying that about 17,000 more children died than would have in the absence of the crisis. Accounting for the precise source of the increase in infant mortality is difficult, but it appears that the collapse in public and private expenditures on health played an important role.

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File URL: http://wws-roxen.princeton.edu/chwpapers/papers/paxson_schady_peru.pdf
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Paper provided by Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing. in its series Working Papers with number 242.

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Date of creation: Dec 2004
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Handle: RePEc:pri:cheawb:paxson_schady_peru
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  1. Yamano, Takashi & Alderman, Harold & Christiaensen, Luc J.M., 2003. "Child Growth, Shocks, And Food Aid In Rural Ethiopia," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25838, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Kenneth Y. Chay & Michael Greenstone, 2003. "The Impact Of Air Pollution On Infant Mortality: Evidence From Geographic Variation In Pollution Shocks Induced By A Recession," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(3), pages 1121-1167, August.
  3. Cameron, Lisa A., 2002. "The impact of the Indonesian financial crisis on children : data from 100 villages survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2799, The World Bank.
  4. Robert Jensen, 2000. "Agricultural Volatility and Investments in Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 399-404, May.
  5. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Market reform and mortality in transition economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(11), pages 2013-2027, November.
  6. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good For Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(2), pages 617-650, May.
  7. Glewwe, Paul & Hall, Gillette, 1994. "Poverty, Inequality, and Living Standards during Unorthodox Adjustment: The Case of Peru, 1985-1990," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(4), pages 689-717, July.
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