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The Squam Lake Report: Fifteen Economists in Search of Financial Reform

  • Alan S. Blinder

    (Princeton University)

The Squam Lake Report is a volume by economists for economists. It offers the fruits of the labors of 15 top economists who met at Squam Lake, New Hampshire, to discuss financial reform. While somewhat disjointed, and avoiding many important issues, the book is nonetheless a tour du force. Its many recommendations derive from two basic principles: that reformers need to think systemically, and that third-party costs stemming from systemic risk need to be internalized. And its approach is just what you would expect from a group of academic economists. It asks (and answers) questions like: Where did incentives go wrong? What were the sources of market failure? How can we better protect society against negative externalities?

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File URL: http://www.princeton.edu/ceps/workingpapers/209blinder.pdf
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Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies. in its series Working Papers with number 1243.

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Date of creation: Aug 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pri:cepsud:209blinder
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  1. Alan S. Blinder & Ricardo Reis, 2005. "Understanding the Greenspan Standard," Working Papers 88, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  2. Alan S. Blinder, 2010. "How Central Should the Central Bank Be?," Working Papers 1202, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  3. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
  4. Gorton, Gary B., 2010. "Slapped by the Invisible Hand: The Panic of 2007," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199734153, March.
  5. repec:fip:fedgsq:y:2010:x:4 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Andrew Crockett, 2009. "Should the Federal Reserve be a Systemic Stability Regulator?," Book Chapters, in: John D. Ciorciari & John Taylor (ed.), The Road Ahead for the Fed, chapter 9 Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
  7. Mishkin, F S., 2008. "How should we respond to asset price bubbles?," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 12, pages 65-74, October.
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