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Fear of Offshoring


  • Alan S. Blinder

    (Princeton University)


One thing you should never predict is the future. That is generally sage advice, which I try to live by. Futurology is a loser?s game. Nonetheless, I am going to ignore this wise canon in this essay and throw caution to the wind. Why? Because one aspect of our economic future seems to me so certain, and its implications so far-reaching and yet non-obvious, that serious thinking about it is imperative--and yet very little attention has been devoted to it to date. I refer to the phenomenon that has been clumsily dubbed offshoring, meaning the migration of certain jobs (but not the people performing them) from rich countries to poor ones.

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  • Alan S. Blinder, 2005. "Fear of Offshoring," Working Papers 83, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:cepsud:119blinder.pdf

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    Cited by:

    1. Charlie Karlsson & Gunther Maier & Michaela Trippl & Iulia Siedschlag & Gavin Murphy, 2010. "ICT and Regional Economic Dynamics: A Literature Review," JRC Working Papers JRC59920, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Canuto, Otaviano & Leipziger, Danny, 2012. "Ascent After Decline: Challenges of Growth," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 75, pages 1-6, February.
    3. Bardhan Ashok & Tang John, 2010. "What Kind of Job is Safer? A Note on Occupational Vulnerability," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-17, January.
    4. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:53:y:2008:i:03:n:s021759080800304x is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Runjuan Liu & Daniel Trefler, 2008. "Much Ado About Nothing: American Jobs and the Rise of Service Outsourcing to China and India," NBER Working Papers 14061, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Hamid, Naved, 2006. "South Asia: A development strategy for the information age," MPRA Paper 9689, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Wilhelm Kohler & Jens Wrona, 2010. "Offshoring Tasks, yet Creating Jobs?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3019, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Rosario Crino, 2006. "Are U.S. White-Collar Really at Risk of Service Offshoring?," KITeS Working Papers 183, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Oct 2006.

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