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Cash Recycling as an Efficiency Enhancing Anti-Poverty Program

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  • Bevin Ashenmiller

    () (Department of Economics, Occidental College)

Abstract

While there are many descriptive articles about cash recyclers this is the first empirical study of people recycling for cash. A new survey shows that cash recycling is an important part of the income of the working poor and that an astonishing twenty percent of the income of professional scavengers comes from recycling. At the same time professional and workplace recyclers are responsible for a large amount of new recycling. A rough estimate of the amount of new recycling generated by the recycling redemption centers in Santa Barbara, CA lies between 36% and 51% of all cash recycling. Based on the evidence presented here it is important for policy makers to consider structuring new bottle laws in ways that encourage professional recycling.

Suggested Citation

  • Bevin Ashenmiller, "undated". "Cash Recycling as an Efficiency Enhancing Anti-Poverty Program," Occidental Economics Working Papers 9, Occidental College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:occ:wpaper:9
    as

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    File URL: http://faculty.oxy.edu/bevin/CashRecycling.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Dinan Terry M., 1993. "Economic Efficiency Effects of Alternative Policies for Reducing Waste Disposal," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 242-256, November.
    6. Hill, Ronald Paul & Stamey, Mark, 1990. " The Homeless in America: An Examination of Possessions and Consumption Behaviors," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(3), pages 303-321, December.
    7. Mirko Draca & Stephen Machin, 2015. "Crime and Economic Incentives," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 389-408, August.
    8. Grogger, Jeff, 1998. "Market Wages and Youth Crime," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 756-791, October.
    9. Palmer, Karen & Walls, Margaret, 1997. "Optimal policies for solid waste disposal Taxes, subsidies, and standards," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 193-205, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    recycling; deposit-refund; Pigouvian tax;

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