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Patent Protection, Innovation Rate and Welfare


  • Uday Bhanu Sinha

    () (National University of Singapore)


In the context of international technology transfer from the developed North to the developing South, this paper analyses the impact of the Southern patent protection on the innovation rate in the North and the welfare effect in the South. In a two-period model, we show how the different modes of technology transfers (licensing or subsidiary) affect the R&D incentive and thereby the rate of innovation in the North. It is shown that under the licensing contract, no patent protection in the South is best for the South as it increases the innovation rate in the North, thereby leading to greater welfare in the South. We also argue for certain degree of patent protection in the South for maximization of its welfare under some parameter configurations.

Suggested Citation

  • Uday Bhanu Sinha, 2001. "Patent Protection, Innovation Rate and Welfare," Departmental Working Papers wp0106, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:nus:nusewp:wp0106

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul M. Romer, 1989. "Increasing Returns and New Developments in the Theory of Growth," NBER Working Papers 3098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1991. "Endogenous Product Cycles," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(408), pages 1214-1229, September.
    3. Helpman, Elhanan, 1993. "Innovation, Imitation, and Intellectual Property Rights," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(6), pages 1247-1280, November.
    4. Lai, Edwin L. -C., 1998. "International intellectual property rights protection and the rate of product innovation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 133-153, February.
    5. Markusen, James R., 2001. "Contracts, intellectual property rights, and multinational investment in developing countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 189-204, February.
    6. Fosfuri, Andrea, 2000. "Patent protection, imitation and the mode of technology transfer," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 18(7), pages 1129-1149, October.
    7. Philippe Aghion & Jean Tirole, 1994. "The Management of Innovation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 1185-1209.
    8. Diwan, Ishac & Rodrik, Dani, 1991. "Patents, appropriate technology, and North-South trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 27-47, February.
    9. Deardorff, Alan V, 1992. "Welfare Effects of Global Patent Protection," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 59(233), pages 35-51, February.
    10. Aghion, P. & Tirole, J., 1993. "On the Management of Innovation," Working papers 93-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    11. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1991. "Endogenous Product Cycles," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(408), pages 1214-1229, September.
    12. Segerstrom, Paul S & Anant, T C A & Dinopoulos, Elias, 1990. "A Schumpeterian Model of the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(5), pages 1077-1091, December.
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    More about this item


    Technology transfer; Patent protection; Innovation; Welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • D45 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Rationing; Licensing

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