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The effect of temporary in-work support on employment retention: evidence from a field experiment

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  • Dr Richard Dorsett

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Abstract

A recent experimental programme for unemployed welfare recipients in the UK found that temporary earnings supplements combined with post-employment services led to increased employment rates. This paper examines whether these overall impacts are due to employment entry or employment retention effects. Findings from a multivariate mixed proportional hazards model suggest that entry effects dominated initially but that longer-term impacts were primarily due to increased retention. This retention effect persisted beyond the operational period of the programme and was evident even after controlling for the effect of employment experience.

Suggested Citation

  • Dr Richard Dorsett, 2013. "The effect of temporary in-work support on employment retention: evidence from a field experiment," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 411, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:nsr:niesrd:11598
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Linda Babcock & William Congdon & Lawrence Katz & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2012. "Notes on behavioral economics and labor market policy," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-14, December.
    2. Heckman, James & Singer, Burton, 1984. "A Method for Minimizing the Impact of Distributional Assumptions in Econometric Models for Duration Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 271-320, March.
    3. van den Berg, Gerard J. & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2001. "Combining micro and macro unemployment duration data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 271-309, June.
    4. Philip K. Robins & Charles Michalopoulos & Kelly Foley, 2008. "Are Two Carrots Better Than One? The Effects of Adding Employment Services to Financial Incentive Programs for Welfare Recipients," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(3), pages 410-423, April.
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    7. Richard Dorsett & Philip K. Robins, 2013. "A Multilevel Analysis of the Impacts of Services Provided by the U.K. Employment Retention and Advancement Demonstration," Evaluation Review, , vol. 37(2), pages 63-108, April.
    8. David Card & Dean R. Hyslop, 2005. "Estimating the Effects of a Time-Limited Earnings Subsidy for Welfare-Leavers," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(6), pages 1723-1770, November.
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    11. Richard Blundell & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2004. "Has 'In-Work' Benefit Reform Helped the Labor Market?," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 411-460 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Curtis Eberwein & John C. Ham & Robert J. Lalonde, 1997. "The Impact of Being Offered and Receiving Classroom Training on the Employment Histories of Disadvantaged Women: Evidence from Experimental Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 655-682.
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    14. Adriaan S. Kalwij, 2004. "Unemployment Experiences of Young Men: on the Road to Stable Employment?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(2), pages 205-237, May.
    15. repec:nsr:niesrd:409 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Heckman, James J. & Singer, Burton, 1984. "Econometric duration analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 63-132.
    17. Richard Dorsett & Deborah Smeaton & Stefan Speckesser, 2013. "The Effect of Making a Voluntary Labour Market Programme Compulsory: Evidence from a UK Experiment," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34, pages 467-489, December.
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    19. Dr Richard Dorsett, 2013. "Can Post-Employment Services Combined with Financial Incentives Improve Employment Retention for Welfare Recipients? Evidence from the Texas Employment Retention and Advancement Evaluation," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 409, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Spermann, 2015. "How to fight long-term unemployment: lessons from Germany," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.
    2. Bruno Van der Linden, 2016. "Do in-work benefits work for low-skilled workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 246-246, March.
    3. Richard Hendra & James Riccio & Richard Dorsett & Philip Robins, 2015. "Breaking the low pay, no pay cycle: the effects of the UK Employment Retention and Advancement programme," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-32, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment retention; earnings supplements; treatment effects; duration model; unobserved heterogeneity;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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