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„What did guide investors decisions” during the classical gold standard era? The case of Ottoman Empire, 1880-1914


  • Ali Coskun Tuncer

    (LSE and Ondokuz Mayis University)


It has been conventionally argued that the gold standard, as a “good housekeeping seal of approval”, provided an easy access to the international financial markets for the peripheral countries during the classical gold standard era. This paper, by relying on the Ottoman case, questions the importance of the gold-related monetary regime (limping gold standard) as a determinant of investors’ decisions, and attempts to answer the question of “what did guide the investors’ decisions” by relying on the revisionist gold standard literature and historical data. It is concluded that International Financial Control exercised by the representatives of the creditors on the Ottoman finances was an important determinant of the cost of borrowing which was neglected by the literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali Coskun Tuncer, 2009. "„What did guide investors decisions” during the classical gold standard era? The case of Ottoman Empire, 1880-1914," SEEMHN papers 2, National Bank of Serbia.
  • Handle: RePEc:nsb:seemhn:2 Note: The paper was presented at the Fourth Annual SEEMHN Conference hosted by the National Bank of Serbia, 27 March 2009 in Belgrade.

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christopher M. Meissner, 2003. "Exchange-Rate Regimes and International Trade: Evidence from the Classical Gold Standard Era," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 344-353, March.
    2. Flandreau, Marc & Jobst, Clemens, 2005. "The Ties that Divide: A Network Analysis of the International Monetary System, 1890 1910," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(04), pages 977-1007, December.
    3. Flandreau, Marc & Flores Zendejas, Juan Huitzilihuitl & Gaillard, Norbert, 2007. "Bonds and Brands: Lessons from the 1820s," CEPR Discussion Papers 6420, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    6. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/622 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Michael D. Bordo & Marc Flandreau, 2003. "Core, Periphery, Exchange Rate Regimes, and Globalization," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 417-472 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    10. Redish,Angela, 2006. "Bimetallism," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521028936, March.
    11. Accominotti, Olivier & Flandreau, Marc & Rezzik, Riad & Zumer, Frédéric, 2008. "Black Man’s Burden: Measured Philanthropy in the British Empire, 1880-1913," CEPR Discussion Papers 6811, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Rui Pedro Esteves, 2007. "Quis custodiet quem? Sovereign Debt and Bondholders` Protection Before 1914," Economics Series Working Papers 323, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    13. Eichengreen, Barry & Flandreau, Marc, 1994. "The Geography of the Gold Standard," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers 233393, University of California-Berkeley, Department of Economics.
    14. Matias Vernengo, 2003. "The Gold Standard and Center-Periphery Interactions," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2003_10, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    15. Bordo Michael D. & Kydland Finn E., 1995. "The Gold Standard As a Rule: An Essay in Exploration," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 423-464, October.
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    More about this item


    Limping Gold Standard; Peripheries; The Ottoman Empire; International Financial Control; Sovereign Debt;

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • N25 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Asia including Middle East


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