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Which Leading Journal Leads? Idea Diffusion in Economics Research Journals

Author

Listed:
  • Allen Bellas

    () (College of Management, Metropolitan State University)

  • Lea Kosnik

    () (Department of Economics, University of Missouri-St. Louis)

Abstract

How do ideas flow through economics research journals? Do the general interest journals set the trends in research attention to particular topics, or is it the field journals that have greater initial influence? In this paper we focus on the subfield of environmental economics and attempt to empirically identify whether it has been the leading general interest journals or the top environmental economics field journal that has set the research trends on climate change, air pollution, water pollution, and other topics. Results indicate that leadership depends on the topic, however, there is some evidence that the top field journal in environmental economics generally took the lead in more controversial topics.

Suggested Citation

  • Allen Bellas & Lea Kosnik, 2016. "Which Leading Journal Leads? Idea Diffusion in Economics Research Journals," Working Papers 1013, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:msl:workng:1013
    as

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    File URL: http://www.umsl.edu/~econ/Research/msl/workng/KosnikWhichLeadingJournalLeads.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sascha O. Becker & Ludger Woessmann, 2013. "Not the Opium of the People: Income and Secularization in a Panel of Prussian Counties," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 539-544, May.
    2. Kosnik, Lea-Rachel, 2015. "What have economists been doing for the last 50 years? A text analysis of published academic research from 1960-2010," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-38.
    3. Lea-Rachel Kosnik, 2016. "In Tandem Or Out Of Sync? Academic Economics Research And Public Policy Measures," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(1), pages 190-202, January.
    4. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2003. "Rankings of Academic Journals and Institutions in Economics," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(6), pages 1346-1366, December.
    5. E. Han Kim & Adair Morse & Luigi Zingales, 2006. "What Has Mattered to Economics Since 1970," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 189-202, Fall.
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    7. Lea Kosnik, 2014. "What Have Economists Been Doing for the Last 50 Years? A Text Analysis of Published Academic Research from 1960-2010," Working Papers 1004, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2015.
    8. Rosell, Carlos & Agrawal, Ajay, 2009. "Have university knowledge flows narrowed?: Evidence from patent data," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 1-13, February.
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    12. Nelson, Charles R, 1979. "Granger Causality and the Natural Rate Hypothesis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(2), pages 390-394, April.
    13. Michael A. Kelly & Stephen Bruestle, 2011. "Trend Of Subjects Published In Economics Journals 1969–2007," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(3), pages 658-673, July.
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    16. Kosnik, Lea-Rachel, 2014. "Determinants of contract completeness: An environmental regulatory application," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 198-208.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    idea diffusion; knowledge diffusion; research; textual analysis; Granger causality.;

    JEL classification:

    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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