IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/msl/workng/1006.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

In Tandem or Out of Sync? Academic Economics Research and Public Policy Measures

Author

Listed:
  • Lea Kosnik

    () (Department of Economics, University of Missouri-St. Louis)

Abstract

This paper investigates whether academic research attention to certain public policy related measures (including unemployment, inflation, bankruptcies, and GDP) is correlated with empirical measurements of the measures themselves. In other words, when unemployment rises, does academic research attention to the matter increase? Or do economists pursue research interests relatively uninfluenced by policy shocks on the ground, at least in the short run? Text-analysis based results imply that economic attention to key public policy terms does correlate with empirical movements of the terms in most instances, however, the stronger and more consistent correlation is between use of public policy terms in the academic literature and discussion of them by the broader public.

Suggested Citation

  • Lea Kosnik, 2015. "In Tandem or Out of Sync? Academic Economics Research and Public Policy Measures," Working Papers 1006, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:msl:workng:1006
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.umsl.edu/econ/Research/WorkingPapers/UMSL_ECON_WP_1006.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kosnik, Lea-Rachel, 2015. "What have economists been doing for the last 50 years? A text analysis of published academic research from 1960-2010," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-38.
    2. Lars Brink, 2013. "Making Agricultural Economics Research Relevant for Policy Advice," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 61(1), pages 15-36, March.
    3. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2013. "Six Decades of Top Economics Publishing: Who and How?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(1), pages 162-172, March.
    4. David Card & Stefano DellaVigna, 2013. "Nine Facts about Top Journals in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(1), pages 144-161, March.
    5. Paul C. Tetlock, 2007. "Giving Content to Investor Sentiment: The Role of Media in the Stock Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(3), pages 1139-1168, June.
    6. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "A journal ranking for the ambitious economist," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue may, pages 127-140.
    7. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2010. "What Drives Media Slant? Evidence From U.S. Daily Newspapers," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(1), pages 35-71, January.
    8. Blank, Rebecca M., 2002. "What do economists have to contribute to policy decision-making?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 817-824.
    9. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2003. "Rankings of Academic Journals and Institutions in Economics," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(6), pages 1346-1366, December.
    10. Pardey, Philip G. & Smith, Vincent H. (ed.), 2004. "What's economics worth? Valuing policy research," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 0-8018-7940-X.
    11. Kosnik, Lea-Rachel, 2014. "Determinants of contract completeness: An environmental regulatory application," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 198-208.
    12. Claud L. Scroggs, 1975. "The Relevance of University Research and Extension Activities in Agricultural Economics to Agribusiness Firms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 57(5), pages 883-888.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. La crisi e la ricerca economica: cosa studiano gli economisti
      by Lorenzo Battisti in Pensieri Economici on 2015-05-27 21:02:00

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:empeco:v:57:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s00181-018-1466-z is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Lea Kosnik, 2016. "JEL Codes: What Do They Mean and Are They Used Consistently?," Working Papers 1011, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Department of Economics.
    3. repec:bla:jecsur:v:32:y:2018:i:1:p:249-272 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:climat:v:151:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10584-018-2330-z is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Allen Bellas & Lea-Rachel Kosnik, 2019. "Which leading journal leads? Idea diffusion in economics research journals," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 901-921, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    text analysis; economics research; public policy; GDP; inflation; unemployment; recession.;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:msl:workng:1006. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Erika Cotton) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Erika Cotton to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/edumsus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.