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Birth and Employment Transitions of Women in Turkey: Conflicting or Compatible Roles?

Author

Listed:
  • Ayse Abbasoglu Ozgoren

    (Department of Demography, Hacettepe University Institute of Population Studies, Ankara, Turkey)

  • Banu Ergocmen

    (Department of Demography, Hacettepe University Institute of Population Studies, Ankara, Turkey)

  • Aysit Tansel

    (Department of Economics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) Bonn, Germany; Economic Research Forum (ERF) Cairo, Egypt)

Abstract

The relationship between fertility and employment among women is a challenging topic that requires further exploration, especially for developing countries where the micro and macro evidence fails to paint a clear picture. This study analyzes the two-way relationship between women’s employment and fertility in Turkey using a hazard approach with piece-wise constant exponential modelling, using data from the 2008 Turkey Demographic and Health Survey. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that makes use of an event history analysis to analyze this relationship within a developing country context. Specifically, a separate analysis is made of the association between the employment statuses of women in their first, second, third, and fourth and higher order conceptions, and the association of fertility and its various dimensions with entry and exit from employment. The findings suggest that a two-way negative association exists between fertility and employment among women in Turkey, with increasing intensities identified among some groups of women. Our findings also cast light on how contextual changes related to the incompatibility of the roles of worker and mother have transformed the fertility-employment relationship in Turkey, in line with propositions of the role incompatibility hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Ayse Abbasoglu Ozgoren & Banu Ergocmen & Aysit Tansel, 2017. "Birth and Employment Transitions of Women in Turkey: Conflicting or Compatible Roles?," ERC Working Papers 1716, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:met:wpaper:1716
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    File URL: http://www.erc.metu.edu.tr/menu/series17/1716.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cruces, Guillermo & Galiani, Sebastian, 2007. "Fertility and female labor supply in Latin America: New causal evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 565-573, June.
    2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2006. "Female labour force participation, fertility and infant mortality in Australia: some empirical evidence from Granger causality tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(5), pages 563-572.
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    7. Ayhan, Sinem H., 2015. "Evidence of Added Worker Effect from the 2008 Economic Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 8937, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    12. repec:hal:journl:hal-01298998 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Employment; Women; Event History Analysis; Turkey.;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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