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Our Grandparents, Our Parents, Our Future Selves: Optimizing Function in Old Age. Syracuse Seminar Series on Aging

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  • Thomas M. Gill

    (Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Investigative Medicine, and the Humana Foundation Professor of Geriatric Medicine, Adler Geriatric Center, 20 York Street, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06510.)

Abstract

Most of my research at Yale University School of Medicine over the past several years has focused on identifying older adults at risk of functional decline and disability, identifying events that may precipitate the transition from functional independence to disability, and developing strategies to postpone or reduce frailty and disability. As a result of the Precipitating Events Project (PEP) and other research conducted by the Yale Center on Aging/Pepper Center, we now realize that age is only a proxy for other factors that lead to disability, and that some of these factors can be modified to reduce the risk of disability. In fact, disability rates have been steadily declining among older adults for decades.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas M. Gill, 2010. "Our Grandparents, Our Parents, Our Future Selves: Optimizing Function in Old Age. Syracuse Seminar Series on Aging," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 42, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  • Handle: RePEc:max:cprpbr:42
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    geriatrics; aging; gerontology; disability; precipitating event; functional decline; vulnerability; compression of morbidity; reserve organ capacity; exercise; physical activity; falls; Yale PREHAB study; lifestyle interventions; independence; elders; FICSIT trial; frailty;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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