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Do We Want to Measure the Quality of Care for Vulnerable Older People? The ACOVE Approach. Syracuse Seminar on Aging

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  • Neil S. Wenger

    (University of California at Los Angeles; RAND Health)

Abstract

There's limited information available about measuring the quality of medical care that is targeted to the needs of older patients. And there's very limited pressure on the system to provide high quality geriatric care. Why is that? Because the quality measures haven't been adequately developed and implemented, and it's more difficult to measure care for an older sample. Measuring care for ill older adults is complex, because they tend to have multiple medical conditions, and they demonstrate substantial variation in goals for care (Wenger and colleagues 2007). The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project began in 1998 as a collaboration between RAND Health and Pzizer Inc to develop and apply quality indicators (QIs) for assessment and treatment targeted at vulnerable older persons. The project involved defining and identifying the target population, identifying health conditions that cover much of the medical care provided to this population, developing quality-of-care indicators to measure how well those conditions are being addressed, and applying thoseindicators to determine the actual quality of care received by older adults.

Suggested Citation

  • Neil S. Wenger, 2008. "Do We Want to Measure the Quality of Care for Vulnerable Older People? The ACOVE Approach. Syracuse Seminar on Aging," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 38, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  • Handle: RePEc:max:cprpbr:38
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    File URL: http://www.maxwell.syr.edu/uploadedFiles/cpr/publications/pb38.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard V. Burkhauser & Timothy M. Smeeding, 1994. "Social Security Reform: A Budget Neutral Approach to Reducing Older Women's Disproportional Risk of Poverty," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 2, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    2. Joshua Goldstein, 1999. "The leveling of divorce in the united states," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(3), pages 409-414, August.
    3. Michael J. Boskin & Douglas J. Puffert, 1987. "Social Security and the American Family," NBER Working Papers 2117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Flowers, Marilyn R, 1979. "Supplemental Benefits for Spouses under Social Security: A Public Choice Explanation of the Law," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(1), pages 125-130, January.
    5. Gary V. Engelhardt & Jonathan Gruber, 2004. "Social Security and the Evolution of Elderly Poverty," NBER Working Papers 10466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Susanna Sandström & Timothy Smeeding, 2005. "Poverty and Income Maintenance in Old Age: A Cross-National View of Low Income Older Women," LIS Working papers 398, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    7. Michael J. Boskin & Douglas J. Puffert, 1987. "Social Security and the American Family," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 1, pages 139-159 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Alicia H. Munnell, 2004. "Why Are So Many Older Women Poor?," Just the Facts jtf_10, Center for Retirement Research.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    health care; medical care; elderly; assessment; geriatrics; gerontology;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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