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Is It Time to Redesign Hospice? End-of-Life Care at the User Interface. Syracuse Seminar on Aging

Author

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  • David J. Casarett

    () (Division of Geriatrics, University of Pennsylvania, and the VA Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion.)

Abstract

Hospice is a system of end-of-life care that’s not used to its full potential. That is, hospice is not used in the way that would benefit patients and families as much as it could. My argument is that this is an issue of usability, or ergonomics—the science of design. I illustrate how to take what we have learned from the science of usability to make hospice more accessible and approachable, and to increase hospice use among those who would benefit from it. Underneath this discussion, though, there is a more fundamental question: Can we make hospice more usable or do we need to think about redesigning hospice entirely?

Suggested Citation

  • David J. Casarett, 2007. "Is It Time to Redesign Hospice? End-of-Life Care at the User Interface. Syracuse Seminar on Aging," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 35, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  • Handle: RePEc:max:cprpbr:35
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    File URL: http://www.maxwell.syr.edu/uploadedFiles/cpr/publications/pb35.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard V. Burkhauser & Timothy M. Smeeding, 1994. "Social Security Reform: A Budget Neutral Approach to Reducing Older Women's Disproportional Risk of Poverty," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 2, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    2. Joshua Goldstein, 1999. "The leveling of divorce in the united states," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(3), pages 409-414, August.
    3. Michael J. Boskin & Douglas J. Puffert, 1987. "Social Security and the American Family," NBER Working Papers 2117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Flowers, Marilyn R, 1979. "Supplemental Benefits for Spouses under Social Security: A Public Choice Explanation of the Law," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(1), pages 125-130, January.
    5. Gary V. Engelhardt & Jonathan Gruber, 2004. "Social Security and the Evolution of Elderly Poverty," NBER Working Papers 10466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Susanna Sandström & Timothy Smeeding, 2005. "Poverty and Income Maintenance in Old Age: A Cross-National View of Low Income Older Women," LIS Working papers 398, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    7. Michael J. Boskin & Douglas J. Puffert, 1987. "Social Security and the American Family," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 1, pages 139-159 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Alicia H. Munnell, 2004. "Why Are So Many Older Women Poor?," Just the Facts jtf_10, Center for Retirement Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Taylor Jr, Donald H. & Ostermann, Jan & Van Houtven, Courtney H. & Tulsky, James A. & Steinhauser, Karen, 2007. "What length of hospice use maximizes reduction in medical expenditures near death in the US Medicare program?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1466-1478.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    nursing home; Medicare; Medicaid; long-term care; elderly; social welfare.;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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