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Allocating Resources within a Big City School District: New York City after Campaign for Fiscal Equity v. New York



In this brief we take a closer look at the mechanisms used to distribute resources across public schools. We first present what we know about the current distribution of educational resources within New York City and other large city districts. Then we discuss current efforts to promote greater equity in the distribution of resources and improve student performance. We conclude with lessons and policy implications for New York State as it implements the CFE decision in New York City. These findings also apply toother large districts in the state, such as Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Albany. Our focus in this brief is on vertical equity--ensuring that schools serving students with different levels of need receive appropriately different levels of resources--rather than adequacy. But the two concepts are closely related. If we ensure that students with a variety of needs have ample resources to achieve agreed upon educational goals, we will achieve both school-level adequacy and vertical equity.

Suggested Citation

  • Ross Rubenstein & Lawrence Miller, 2005. "Allocating Resources within a Big City School District: New York City after Campaign for Fiscal Equity v. New York," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 31, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  • Handle: RePEc:max:cprpbr:31

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ross Rubenstein & Lawrence O. Picus, 2003. "Politics, the courts, and the economy: Implications for the future of school financing," Chapters,in: State and Local Finances under Pressure, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Anita A. Summers & Barbara L. Wolfe, 1976. "Intradistrict Distribution of School Inputs to the Disadvantaged: Evidence for the Courts," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 11(3), pages 328-342.
    3. William Duncombe & Anna Lukemeyer & John Yinger, 2004. "Education Finance Reform in New York: Calculating the Cost of a 'Sound Basic Education' in New York City," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 28, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    4. Rubenstein, Ross & Schwartz, Amy Ellen & Stiefel, Leanna & Amor, Hella Bel Hadj, 2007. "From districts to schools: The distribution of resources across schools in big city school districts," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 532-545, October.
    5. Andrews, Matthew & Duncombe, William & Yinger, John, 2002. "Revisiting economies of size in American education: are we any closer to a consensus?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 245-262, June.
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    More about this item


    intradistrict resource allocation; interdistrict resource allocation; vertical equity; across-school disparities; school-based funding; weighted student funding.;

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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