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Discriminating Factors of Women's Employment. Using Territorial Heterogeneity to Inform Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Angela Cipollone

    () (Department of Economic and Business Sciences, LUISS Guido Carli)

  • Carlo D'Ippoliti

    () (Department of Economic and Business Sciences, LUISS Guido Carli)

Abstract

We employ the dramatic heterogeneity across ItalyÕs Regions to assess the impact of selected context factors on menÕs and womenÕs employment by means of multilevel analysis. Observing that individual factors strongly interact with local policies and institutions in determining womenÕs employment, we claim that any attempt to explore solely its supply-side determinants might lead to biased estimates. Aggregate growth and tertiarisation of the economy are surprisingly found beneficial only to menÕs employment, while culture and discrimination are relevant for womenÕs. Social Assistance is found highly significant, with the provision of services being more beneficial to womenÕs employment than monetary transfers.

Suggested Citation

  • Angela Cipollone & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2008. "Discriminating Factors of Women's Employment. Using Territorial Heterogeneity to Inform Policy," Quaderni DEF 145, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
  • Handle: RePEc:lui:wpaper:145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differentials; employment policy; regional development policy;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

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