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Boom and bust in capital flows to developing countries: what South Asia can learn from recent financial crises

  • Nunnenkamp, Peter

Politicians in Asia and some economists contend that developing countries are at the mercy of the rapidly changing winds blowing from international capital markets. We are indeed witnessing another episode of volatility in capital flows, with foreign investors suddenly fleeing emerging markets in Asia. However, speculative attacks are a symptom, rather than the cause of financial turbulences and currency crises in developing countries. In the era of globalization, policy consistency and government credibility have become still more important for sustaining external financing. South Asia would be ill - advised to forgo the benefits of capital inflows in order to avoid the risk of subsequent outflows. Rather, South Asian governments should not repeat the economic policy failures that are underlying the recent crises in Latin America and East Asia.

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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 853.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:853
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  1. Langhammer, Rolf J. & Schweickert, Rainer, 1995. "The Mexican reform process : improving long-run perspectives and mastering short-run turbulences," Kiel Discussion Papers 255, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  2. Erich Gundlach, 1997. "Openness and economic growth in developing countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 133(3), pages 479-496, September.
  3. Montiel, Peter J, 1994. "Capital Mobility in Developing Countries: Some Measurement Issues and Empirical Estimates," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(3), pages 311-50, September.
  4. Gundlach, Erich & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 1996. "Some consequences of globalization for developing countries," Kiel Working Papers 753, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  5. Martin Feldstein & Charles Horioka, 1979. "Domestic Savings and International Capital Flows," NBER Working Papers 0310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen Reinhart & Guillermo Calvo, 1992. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America; The Role of External Factors," IMF Working Papers 92/62, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo & Leiderman, Leonardo, 1992. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America," MPRA Paper 13843, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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