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The technological specialization of Europe in the 1990s

  • Foders, Federico
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    This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on the international position of Europe by (i) presenting new evidence on technological specialization and competitiveness and (ii) exploring methodological issues underlying the empirical analysis. The results show that the technological profile of the member countries of the European Union offers a wide scope for technology transfer and inter-industry trade both within the European Union and between the member countries of the European Union on the one hand and Japan, the United States and Eastern Europe on the other. However, risks loom large in the possible eastward enlargement of the European Union and in the formation of a monetary union, because of the former's and the latter's potential impact on the European Union's technological profile and the international competitiveness of European firms.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/681/1/043473040.pdf
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    Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 675.

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    Date of creation: 1995
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    Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:675
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    1. Ballance, Robert H & Forstner, Helmut & Murray, Tracy, 1987. "Consistency Tests of Alternative Measures of Comparative Advantage," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 157-61, February.
    2. Paul M. Romer, 1994. "The Origins of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 3-22, Winter.
    3. Kravis, Irving B & Lipsey, Robert E, 1992. "Sources of Competitiveness of the United States and of Its Multinational Firms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 193-201, May.
    4. Nelson, Richard R & Wright, Gavin, 1992. "The Rise and Fall of American Technological Leadership: The Postwar Era in Historical Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1931-64, December.
    5. Grossman, G.M. & Helpman, E., 1993. "Endogenous, Innovation in the Theory of Growth," Papers 165, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs.
    6. Thomas Vollrath, 1991. "A theoretical evaluation of alternative trade intensity measures of revealed comparative advantage," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 265-280, June.
    7. Marcus Noland & Bela Balassa, 1988. "Japan in the World Economy," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 0412, December.
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