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Outsourcing, Offshoring and Innovation: Evidence from Firm-level Data for Emerging Economies

  • Ursula Fritsch
  • Holger Görg

It is striking that by far the lion’s share of empirical studies on the impact of outsourcing on firms considers industrialized countries. However, outsourcing by firms from emerging economies is far from negligible and growing. This paper investigates the link between outsourcing and innovation empirically using firm-level data for over 20 emerging market economies. We find robust evidence that outsourcing is associated with a greater probability to spend on research and development and to introduce new products and upgrade existing products. The effect of offshoring on R&D spending is significantly higher than the effect of domestic outsourcing. However, only domestic outsourcing increases the probability to introduce new products. We also show that the results crucially depend on the level of protection of intellectual property in the economy. Firms increase their own R&D effort in the wake of outsourcing only if they operate in an environment that intensively protects intellectual property

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File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/outsourcing-offshoring-and-innovation-evidence-from-firm-level-data-for-emerging-economies/Outsourcing%20offshoring%20and%20innovation%20Goerg%20Fritsch.pdf
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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1861.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1861
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  1. Paulo G. Correa & Ana M. Fernandes & Chris J. Uregian, 2010. "Technology Adoption and the Investment Climate: Firm-Level Evidence for Eastern Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(1), pages 121-147, January.
  2. Mirabelle Muuls & Mauro Pisu, 2007. "Imports and exports at the level of the firm: evidence from Belgium," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19711, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Jan Svejnar & Katherine Terrell, 2008. "Globalization and innovation in emerging markets," NBER Working Papers 14481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Görg, Holger & Hanley, Aoife, 2009. "Services Outsourcing and Innovation: An Empirical Investigation," IZA Discussion Papers 4404, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  7. Glass, Amy Jocelyn & Saggi, Kamal, 2001. "Innovation and wage effects of international outsourcing," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 67-86, January.
  8. Mary Amiti & Jozef Konings, 2007. "Trade Liberalization, Intermediate Inputs, and Productivity: Evidence from Indonesia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(5), pages 1611-1638, December.
  9. Pinelopi Goldberg & Amit Khandelwal & Nina Pavcnik & Petia Topalova, 2009. "Trade Liberalization and New Imported Inputs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 494-500, May.
  10. Markusen, James R., 2001. "Contracts, intellectual property rights, and multinational investment in developing countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 189-204, February.
  11. Glass, Amy Jocelyn & Saggi, Kamal, 2002. "Intellectual property rights and foreign direct investment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 387-410, March.
  12. Maurice Kugler & Eric Verhoogen, 2009. "Plants and Imported Inputs: New Facts and an Interpretation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 501-07, May.
  13. Bas, Maria, 2012. "Input-trade liberalization and firm export decisions: Evidence from Argentina," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 481-493.
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