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Can Carbon Based Import Tariffs Effectively Reduce Carbon Emissions?

  • Michael Hübler

We estimate CO2 implicitly contained in traded commodities based on the GTAP 7 data: While net carbon imports into the industrialized countries amount to 15% of their total emissions, net carbon exports of the developing countries amount to 12% of their total emissions, and net carbon exports of China amount to 24% of China's total emissions. We also analyze policies under a global per capita emissions based contraction and convergence regime with emission trading: When China joins the regime, the developing countries will benefit, while the industrialized countries will be almost unaffected. When China does not join the regime and instead a carbon content based border tax is imposed, the industrialized countries will significantly benefit, while China will be significantly worse off. The effect of the border tax adjustment on the global carbon price and on global emissions seems negligible

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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1565.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1565
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  1. Peterson, Sonja & Klepper, Gernot, 2007. "Distribution matters: Taxes vs. emissions trading in post Kyoto climate regimes," Kiel Working Papers 1380, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  2. Lessmann, Kai & Marschinski, Robert & Edenhofer, Ottmar, 2009. "The effects of tariffs on coalition formation in a dynamic global warming game," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 641-649, May.
  3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
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  6. Meade, James E, 1974. "A Note on Border-Tax Adjustments," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 1013-15, Sept./Oct.
  7. Michael Hübler, 2009. "Energy Saving Technology Diffusion via FDI and Trade: A CGE Model of China," Kiel Working Papers 1479, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  8. Paul Veenendaal & Ton Manders, 2008. "Border tax adjustment and the EU-ETS, a quantitative assessment," CPB Document 171, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  9. Jiahua Pan & Jonathan Phillips & Ying Chen, 2008. "China's balance of emissions embodied in trade: approaches to measurement and allocating international responsibility," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 354-376, Summer.
  10. Wiedmann, Thomas & Lenzen, Manfred & Turner, Karen & Barrett, John, 2007. "Examining the global environmental impact of regional consumption activities -- Part 2: Review of input-output models for the assessment of environmental impacts embodied in trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 15-26, February.
  11. John Whalley & Xian Xin, 2006. "China's FDI and Non-FDI Economies and the Sustainability of Future High Chinese Growth," NBER Working Papers 12249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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