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Transitivity in Health Utility Measurement: An Experimental Analysis

  • Ulrich Schmidt
  • Michael Stolpe

Several experimental studies observed substantial violations of transitivity in decisions between risky lotteries over monetary outcomes. The goal of our experiment is to test whether these violations also affect the evaluation of health states. A particular feature of our experimental design is that it takes into account the possible role of decision errors in generating violations of transitivity. Since we find neither substantial nor systematic deviations from transitive choice behaviour, we can conclude that previously reported violations do not seem to bias health utility measurement

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File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/transitivity-in-health-utility-measurement-an-experimental-analysis/KWP_1412
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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1412.

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Length: 10 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1412
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  1. Loomes, Graham & Starmer, Chris & Sugden, Robert, 1989. "Preference Reversal: Information-Processing Effect or Rational Non-transitive Choice?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(395), pages 140-51, Supplemen.
  2. Starmer, Chris & Sugden, Robert, 1998. "Testing Alternative Explanations of Cyclical Choices," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(259), pages 347-61, August.
  3. Han Bleichrodt & Jose Luis Pinto-Prades, 2007. "A new preference reversal in health utility measurement," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2007/15, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  4. Chris Starmer, 1999. "Cycling with Rules of Thumb: An Experimental Test for a new form of Non-Transitive Behaviour," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 139-157, April.
  5. Michael H. Birnbaun & Ulrich Schmidt, 2008. "An Experimental Investigation of Violations of Transitivity in Choice under Uncertainty," Kiel Working Papers 1396, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  6. Loomes, Graham & Taylor, Caron, 1992. "Non-transitive Preferences over Gains and Losses," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(411), pages 357-65, March.
  7. Robinson, Angela & Dolan, Paul & Williams, Alan, 1997. "Valuing health status using VAS and TTO: What lies behind the numbers?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1289-1297, October.
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