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Preventing financial instability and currency crises

  • Horst Siebert
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    Financial crises can have a severe impact on the real side of the economy with countries losing up to 20 percent of GDP. The paper studies rules that prevent financial instability and currency crises. These include institutional arrangements for a solid banking system, prudent regulations and appropriate principles of monetary policy. The paper studies the role of the IMF in light of the past experience in preventing currency crises and a systemic breakdown of the world’s financial system and points out necessary IMF reforms. It discusses how the IMF should adjust to the structural changes in the world economy.

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    File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/more-coffee-more-cigarettes-coffee-market-liberalisation-gender-and-bargaining-in-uganda-1/KWP%201402.pdf
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    Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1401.

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    Length: 34 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1401
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Kiellinie 66, D-24105 Kiel
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    Web page: http://www.ifw-kiel.de
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    1. Martin Browning & Pierre-Andre Chiappori, 1994. "Efficient Intra-Household Allocations: a General Characterization and Empirical Tests," Department of Economics Working Papers 1994-02, McMaster University.
    2. Martin Browning & Pierre-André Chiappori & Valérie Lechene, 2006. "Collective and Unitary Models: A Clarification," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 5-14, 03.
    3. Alderman, Harold, et al, 1995. "Unitary versus Collective Models of the Household: Is It Time to Shift the Burden of Proof?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 1-19, February.
    4. Bourguignon, F. & Chiappori, P-A., 1991. "Collective Models of Household Behaviour: An Introduction," DELTA Working Papers 91-29, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    5. Hoddinott, John & Haddad, Lawrence, 1995. "Does Female Income Share Influence Household Expenditures? Evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 77-96, February.
    6. Esther Duflo & Christopher Udry, 2004. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in Cote d'Ivoire: Social Norms, Separate Accounts and Consumption Choices," NBER Working Papers 10498, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "A Theory of Marriage: Part II," NBER Chapters, in: Marriage, Family, Human Capital, and Fertility, pages 11-26 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. John Baffes, 2007. "Restructuring Uganda’s Coffee Industry : Why Going Back to the Basics Matters," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9577, The World Bank.
    9. Kappel, Robert & Lay, Jann & Steiner, Susan, 2005. "Uganda: No more pro-poor growth?," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 3715, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Silberschmidt, Margrethe, 2001. "Disempowerment of Men in Rural and Urban East Africa: Implications for Male Identity and Sexual Behavior," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 657-671, April.
    11. John Baffes, 2006. "Restructuring Uganda's Coffee Industry: Why Going Back to Basics Matters," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(4), pages 413-436, 07.
    12. Evers, Barbara & Walters, Bernard, 2000. "Extra-Household Factors and Women Farmers' Supply Response in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1341-1345, July.
    13. Lim, Sung Soo & Winter-Nelson, Alex & Arends-Kuenning, Mary, 2007. "Household Bargaining Power and Agricultural Supply Response: Evidence from Ethiopian Coffee Growers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1204-1220, July.
    14. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521296762 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Nicita, Alessandro & Razzaz, Susan, 2003. "Who benefits and how much? : how gender affects welfare impacts of a booming textile industry," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3029, The World Bank.
    16. G¸nseli Berik & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers & Joseph E. Zveglich, 2004. "International Trade and Gender Wage Discrimination: Evidence from East Asia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(2), pages 237-254, 05.
    17. Bussolo, Maurizio & Godart, Olivier & Lay, Jann & Thiele, Rainer, 2006. "The impact of commodity price changes on rural households : the case of coffee in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4088, The World Bank.
    18. Kappel, Robert & Lay, Jann & Steiner, Susan, 2005. "Uganda: No more pro-poor growth?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 31, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    19. Agnes R. Quisumbing & John A. Maluccio, 2003. "Resources at Marriage and Intrahousehold Allocation: Evidence from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Indonesia, and South Africa," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(3), pages 283-327, 07.
    20. Deaton, Angus S & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier & Thomas, Duncan, 1989. "The Influence of Household Composition on Household Expenditure Patterns: Theory and Spanish Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(1), pages 179-200, February.
    21. Bourguignon, F. & Browning, M. & Chiappori, P.A. & Lechene, V., 1992. "Intra Household Allocation of Consumption : A Model and Some Evidence from French Data," DELTA Working Papers 92-08, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    22. Evers, Barbara & Walters, Bernard, 2001. "The Model of a Gender-Segregated Low-Income Economy Reconsidered: Evidence from Uganda," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 76-88, February.
    23. Seguino, Stephanie, 2000. "The Effects of Structural Change and Economic Liberalisation on Gender Wage Differentials in South Korea and Taiwan," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(4), pages 437-59, July.
    24. Deaton, Angus S, 1989. "Looking for Boy-Girl Discrimination in Household Expenditure Data," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 3(1), pages 1-15, January.
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