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Explaining Labour Market Inactivity in Migrant-Sending Families: Housework, Hammock, or Higher Education

  • Dennis Görlich
  • Toman Omar Mahmoud
  • Christoph Trebesch

This article presents a new perspective on the impact of migration and remittances on labour market participation and time allocation in migrant-sending families. Departing from the common finding that labour market participation is lower in migrant households, we investigate whether the reasons for inactivity, i.e. leisure consumption, home production and higher education are affected by migration. Based on household survey data from Moldova, our results challenge the assertion that those who stay behind consume more leisure. Instead, living in a migrant household implies higher probabilities of intra-household labour substitution and a substantially higher likelihood of university enrolment.

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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1391.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1391
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