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Selfish-biased conditional cooperation: On the decline of contributions in repeated public goods experiments

  • Tibor Neugebauer
  • Javier Perote
  • Ulrich Schmidt
  • Malte Loos

In the recent literature, several hypotheses have been put forward in order to explain the decline of contributions in repeated public good games. We present results of an experiment which allows to evaluate these hypotheses. The main characteristics of our experimental design are a variation of information feedback and an elicitation of individual beliefs about others’ contributions. Altogether, our data support the hypothesis of conditional cooperation with a selfish bias.

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File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/selfish-biased-conditional-cooperation-on-the-decline-of-contributions-in-repeated-public-goods-experiments/kap1376.pdf
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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1376.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1376
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