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The Duration of Union Membership: an Empirical Study

  • Andrea Vaona

Thanks to direct access to union databanks, this paper can answer two new questions in Industrial Relations: how long union membership lasts and what are the determinants of its duration. This also allows to conceptualize union membership as a much more dynamic phenomenon than in previous studies, where it was considered a static situation whose causes or e¤ects were to be investigated. Survival analysis applied to a sample of 48705 workers highlights that union membership duration is a positive, though declining, function of age. Furthermore, women, ..exi- ble.workers, foreign ones and those working in cities tend to show less attachment to union membership than the other workers.

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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1268.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1268
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  1. Schnabel, Claus & Wagner, Joachim, 2003. "Determinants of Trade Union Membership in Western Germany: Evidence from Micro Data, 1980-2000," IZA Discussion Papers 708, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Stephen Machin, 2000. "Union Decline in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 631-645, December.
  3. Stephen Machin, 2002. "Factors of Convergence and Divergence in Union Membership," CEP Discussion Papers dp0554, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Corneo, Giacomo G., 1997. "The theory of the open shop trade union reconsidered," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 71-84, March.
  5. Moreton, David, 1999. "A Model of Labour Productivity and Union Density in British Private Sector Unionised Establishments," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 322-44, April.
  6. Corneo, Giacomo, 1995. "Social custom, management opposition, and trade union membership," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 275-292, February.
  7. Nicola-Maria Riley, 1997. "Determinants of Union Membership: A Review," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(2), pages 265-301, 06.
  8. Jelle Visser, 2002. "Why Fewer Workers Join Unions in Europe: A Social Custom Explanation of Membership Trends," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 40(3), pages 403-430, 09.
  9. Rafael Gomez & Morley Gunderson & Noah Meltz, 2002. "Comparing Youth and Adult Desire for Unionization in Canada," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 40(3), pages 542-519, 09.
  10. Wagner, Joachim, 1990. "Gewerkschaftsmitgliedschaft und Arbeitseinkommen in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Eine ökonometrische Analyse mit Individualdaten," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-155, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  11. Andy Charlwood, 2002. "Why Do Non-union Employees Want to Unionize? Evidence from Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 40(3), pages 463-491, 09.
  12. van den Berg, Annette & Groot, Wim, 1992. "Union Membership in the Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 537-64.
  13. Laszlo Goerke & Markus Pannenberg, 1998. "Social Custom, Free-Riders, and Trade Union Membership in Germany and Great Britain," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 177, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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