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Consumption Volatility and Financial Openness

  • Claudia M. Buch
  • Serkan Yener

Economic theory predicts that the integration of financial markets lowers the volatility of consumption. In this paper, we study long-term trends in the consumption volatility of the G7 countries. Using different measures of financial openness, we find that greater financial openness has been associated with lower consumption volatility in Canada and Italy. In France, Germany, Japan, and the UK, consumption volatility has declined following equity market liberalization but not following capital account liberalization as such.

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File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/consumption-volatility-and-financial-openness/kap1260.pdf
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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1260.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1260
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  1. Sergio L. Schmukler & Graciela Laura Kaminsky, 2003. "Short-Run Pain, Long-Run Gain; The Effects of Financial Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 03/34, International Monetary Fund.
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  4. Ricardo Reis, 2009. "The Time-Series Properties of Aggregate Consumption: Implications for the Costs of Fluctuations," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(4), pages 722-753, 06.
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  8. Robert E. Lucas Jr., 2003. "Macroeconomic Priorities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 1-14, March.
  9. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Quah, Danny, 1989. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 655-73, September.
  10. David K. Backus & Patrick J. Kehoe & Finn E. Kydland, 1987. "International real business cycles," Working Papers 426, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  11. Schwert, G William, 1989. " Why Does Stock Market Volatility Change over Time?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(5), pages 1115-53, December.
  12. Marianne Baxter & Robert G. King, 1995. "Measuring Business Cycles Approximate Band-Pass Filters for Economic Time Series," NBER Working Papers 5022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Sutherland, Alan, 1996. " Financial Market Integration and Macroeconomic Volatility," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(4), pages 521-39, December.
  14. Hansen, Lars Peter & Hodrick, Robert J, 1980. "Forward Exchange Rates as Optimal Predictors of Future Spot Rates: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(5), pages 829-53, October.
  15. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R. & Lundblad, Christian, 2006. "Growth volatility and financial liberalization," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 370-403, April.
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