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The Baltic States' Integration into the European Division of Labour

  • Claus-Friedrich Laaser
  • Klaus Schrader
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    The analysis of Baltic trade statistics and gravity estimates reveal that Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have rapidly integrated into the international division of labour with a distinct EU focus. The Baltic States have taken a road towards the EU common market which pays particular attention to close trade relations with their immediate neighbours in the Baltic Sea Region. The Baltic Sea obviously serves as a major integrating device for these countries. At the same time the Baltic States, although being no longer integrated into the former intra-Soviet division of labour, have not abandoned their contacts to the Soviet successor states altogether. Accordingly, they still have the potential to serve as a gateway from Europe to the CIS markets.

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    File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/the-baltic-states-integration-into-the-european-division-of-labour/kap1234.pdf
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    Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1234.

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    Length: 38 pages
    Date of creation: Dec 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1234
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