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Liberalization and Regulation of International Capital Flows: Where the Opposites Meet

  • Peter Nunnenkamp

The paper discusses the pros and cons of capital account liberalization. Rather than contrasting liberalization and regulation of capital flows as irreconcilable antagonisms, we argue that capital account liberalization requires institutional and regulatory safeguards. Even though the effectiveness of specific capital controls cannot be taken for granted, we reject the view that financial globalization has deprived national policymakers of the means to protect their economies against crisis. In addition to national safeguards, we assess the chances for crisis prevention and resolution on the regional level and present options to overcome institutional deficits on the global level. We conclude that reforms of the international financial architecture can help prevent illiquidity and ensure a fair burden sharing in the case of insolvency, without aggravating moral hazard behavior of the parties involved.

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File URL: https://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/liberalization-and-regulation-of-international-capital-flows-where-the-opposites-meet/kap1029.pdf
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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1029.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1029
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  1. Buch, Claudia M. & Heinrich, Ralph P. & Pierdzioch, Christian, 1998. "Taxing short-term capital flows - An option for transition economies?," Kiel Discussion Papers 321, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  2. Enrica Detragiache & Asli Demirgüç-Kunt, 1998. "Financial Liberalization and Financial Fragility," IMF Working Papers 98/83, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Borensztein, E. & De Gregorio, J. & Lee, J-W., 1998. "How does foreign direct investment affect economic growth?1," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 115-135, June.
  4. Graham Bird & Ramkishen Rajan, 2000. "Is there a Case for an Asian Monetary Fund?," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 1(2), pages 135-143, April.
  5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
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