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Does gender moderate the influence of emotions on risk-taking? Preliminary meta-analytic evidence from multiple price lists

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  • Matteo M. Marini

    (Department of Economics and Management, University of Florence, Italy)

Abstract

This paper is a follow-up investigation to the aggregate data meta-analysis by Marini (2021), the latter study being designed to detect what experimental protocols moderate the effect of emotions on risk-taking. Our work purports to check the robustness of Marini (2021)’s findings when gender is taken into account as a moderator. The goal is pursued by pooling individual participant data from the subset of studies that make use of multiple price lists as risk elicitation method. We find preliminary support for the results of the benchmark metaanalysis to the extent that sadness promotes risk aversion and subjects take greater risks when studies are conducted in individualist countries. Gender does not moderate the influence of emotions on risk propensity, whereas safe choices become more popular as the magnitude of financial rewards increases.

Suggested Citation

  • Matteo M. Marini, 2021. "Does gender moderate the influence of emotions on risk-taking? Preliminary meta-analytic evidence from multiple price lists," Working Papers 2021/06, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
  • Handle: RePEc:jau:wpaper:2021/06
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    : meta-analysis; gender differences; emotion; risk-taking; multiple price list;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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