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Welche Ursachen hat die Spreizung der Lohneinkommen in den USA? Aktuelle Aspekte der Forschung und der politischen Diskussion

  • Peter Franz

Data sets from OECD countries and especially the US indicate growing inequalities in income and thus stimulate research with respect to this topic. In this paper the basic arguments and results of several studies with an economic and a sociological background are compared and discussed. It concentrates a) on the theory of Kuznets and its modifications, b) on the “technology vs. trade” controversy, and c) on panel studies which allow an analysis of income mobility. Finally the research questions are dealt with if Germany will show similar degrees of income inequality as in the US in the years to come and if the two countries differ in their political tolerance towards income inequality.

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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 65.

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Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:65
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  1. Moshe Buchinsky & Jennifer Hunt, 1999. "Wage Mobility In The United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 351-368, August.
  2. Stephen Machin & Annette Ryan & John Van Reenen, 1996. "Technology and changes in skill structure: Evidence from an international panel of industries," IFS Working Papers W96/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Richard Layard & Stephen Nickell, 1992. "Unemployment in the OECD Countries," CEP Discussion Papers dp0081, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Nickell, Stephen & Bell, Brian, 1996. "Changes in the Distribution of Wages and Unemployment in OECD Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 302-08, May.
  5. Gary Burtless, 1995. "International Trade and the Rise in Earnings Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 800-816, June.
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