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Are there Gender-specific Preferences for Location Factors? A Grouped Conditional Logit-Model of Interregional Migration Flows in Germany

  • Lutz Schneider
  • Alexander Kubis

The article analyses the question whether women and men differ in their tastes for location factors. The question is answered by quantifying the impact of location characteristics on interregional migration flows across Germany. The analysis is based on a grouped conditional logit approach. We augment the framework by controlling for violation of the independence of irrelevant alternatives assumption and for overdispersion. As a result, we find no differences in terms of direction of impact. However, the regressions confirm gender differences in terms of intensity, particularly regarding regional wage levels and the availability of educational institutions.

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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 5.

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Date of creation: Feb 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:5-09
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  1. Paulo Guimaraes & Octávio Figueiredo & Douglas Woodward, 2004. "Industrial Location Modeling: Extending the Random Utility Framework," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(1), pages 1-20.
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  7. Paul S. Davies & Michael J. Greenwood & Haizheng Li, 2001. "A Conditional Logit Approach to U.S. State-to-State Migration," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 337-360.
  8. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-73, October.
  9. Dahlberg, Matz & Eklöf, Matias, 2003. "Relaxing the IIA Assumption in Locational Choice Models: A Comparison Between Conditional Logit, Mixed Logit, and Multinomial Probit Models," Working Paper Series 2003:9, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  10. Brian Cushing & Jacques Poot, 2003. "Crossing boundaries and borders: Regional science advances in migration modelling," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, vol. 83(1), pages 317-338, October.
  11. Ashok Parikh & Michiel Van Leuvensteijn, 2003. "Interregional labour mobility, inequality and wage convergence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(8), pages 931-941.
  12. Jennifer Hunt, 2000. "Why Do People Still Live in East Germany?," NBER Working Papers 7564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  15. Peter Huber, 2004. "Inter-regional Mobility in Europe. A Note on the Cross-Country Evidence," WIFO Working Papers 221, WIFO.
  16. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2003. "Migration and Regional Adjustment to Asymmetric Shocks in Transition Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3798, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  18. Dumont, Jean-Christophe & Martin, John P. & Spielvogel, Gilles, 2007. "Women on the Move: The Neglected Gender Dimension of the Brain Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 2920, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  19. Paulo Guimar�es & Richard C. Lindrooth, 2007. "Controlling for overdispersion in grouped conditional logit models: A computationally simple application of Dirichlet-multinomial regression," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 10(2), pages 439-452, 07.
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