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Evaluation of Further Training Programmes with an Optimal Matching Algorithm

  • Eva Reinowski
  • Birgit Schultz
  • Jürgen Wiemers

This study evaluates the effects of further training on the individual unemployment duration of different groups of persons representing individual characteristics and some aspects of the economic environment. The Micro Census Saxony enables us to include additional information about a person's employment history to eliminate the bias resulting from unobservable characteristics and to avoid Ashenfelter's Dip. In order to solve the sample selection problem we employ an optimal full matching assignment, the Hungarian algorithm. The impact of participation in further training is evaluated by comparing the unemployment duration between participants and non-participants using the Kaplan-Meier-estimator. Overall, we find empirical evidence that participation in further training programmes results in even longer unemployment duration.

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File URL: http://www.iwh-halle.de/d/publik/disc/188.pdf
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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 188.

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Date of creation: Feb 2004
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Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:188
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  1. Christensen, Björn, 2001. "Berufliche Weiterbildung und Arbeitsplatzrisiko: Ein Matching-Ansatz," Kiel Working Papers 1033, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  2. Bergemann, Annette & Fitzenberger, Bernd & Speckesser, Stefan, 2005. "Evaluating the Dynamic Employment Effects of Training Programs in East Germany Using Conditional Difference-in-Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 1848, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
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