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EU Accession Countries’ Specialisation Patterns in Foreign Trade and Domestic Production - What can we infer for catch-up prospects?

  • Johannes Stephan

This paper supplements prior analysis on ‘patterns and prospects’ (Stephan, 2003) in which prospects for the speed of future productivity growth were assessed by looking at the specialisation patterns in domestic production. This analysis adds the foreign trade sphere to the results generated in the prior analysis. The refined results are broadly in line with the results from the original analysis, indicating the robustness of our methods applied in either analysis. The most prominent results pertain to Slovenia and the Slovak Republic. Those two countries appear to be best suited for swift productivity catch-up from the viewpoint of sectoral specialisation. Poland and Estonia exhibit the lowest potentials. Only for the case of Poland would results suggest bleak prospects.

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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 184.

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Date of creation: Nov 2003
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Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:184
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  1. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521480857 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Dr Johannes Stephan, 2004. "Evolving Structural Patterns in the Enlarging European Division of Labour: Sectoral and Branch Specialisation and the Potentials for Closing the Productivity Gap," Development and Comp Systems 0403003, EconWPA.
  3. Volkhart Vincentz & Michael Knogler, 2003. "Szenarien der mittelfristigen Konvergenz der EU-Beitrittsländer Polen, Slowakische Republik und Ungarn," Working Papers 244, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
  4. Yvonne Wolfmayr-Schnitzer, . "Economic Integration, Specialisation and the Location of Industries. A Survey of the Theoretical Literature," WIFO Working Papers 120, WIFO.
  5. Peter Havlik, 2001. "Patterns of Catching-Up in Candidate Countries' Manufacturing Industry," wiiw Research Reports 279, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  6. Hlouskova, Jaroslava & Wagner, Martin, 2002. "The CEEC10's Real Convergence Prospects," CEPR Discussion Papers 3318, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Snower, Dennis J., 1994. "The Low-Skill, Bad-Job Trap," CEPR Discussion Papers 999, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Michael Peneder, . "Intangible Investment and Human Resources. The New WIFO Taxonomy of Manufacturing Industries," WIFO Working Papers 114, WIFO.
  9. Zsolt M. Darvas & András Simon, 2000. "Capital Stock and Economic Development in Hungary," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 8(1), pages 197-223, March.
  10. Peter Havlik & Michael Landesmann & Robert Stehrer, 2001. "Competitiveness of CEE Industries: Evidence From Foreign Trade Specialization and Quality Indicators," wiiw Research Reports 278, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
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