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Industrial Associations as a Channel of Business-Government Interactions in an Imperfect Institutional Environment: The Russian Case

  • A. Yakovlev
  • A. Govorun

International lessons from emerging economies suggest that business associations may provide an effective channel of communication between the government and the private sector. This function of business associations may become still more important in transition economies, where old mechanisms for coordinating enterprise activities have been destroyed, while the new ones have not been established yet. In this context, Russian experience is a matter of interest, because for a long time, Russia was regarded as a striking example of state failures and market failures. Consequently, the key point of our study was a description of the role and place of business associations in the presentday Russian economy and their interaction with member companies and bodies of state administration. Relying on the survey data of 957 manufacturing firms conducted in 2009, we found that business associations are more frequently joined by larger companies, firms located in regional capital cities, and firms active in investment and innovation. By contrast, business associations tend to be less frequently joined by business groups’ subsidiaries and firms that were non-responsive about their respective ownership structures. Our regression analysis has also confirmed that business associations are a component of what Frye (2002) calls an “elite exchange”– although only on regional and local levels. These “exchanges” imply that members of business associations, on the one hand, more actively assist regional and local authorities in social development of their regions, and on the other hand more often receive support from authorities. However, this effect is insignificant in terms of support from the federal government. In general, our results allow us to believe that at present, business associations (especially the industry-wide and “leading” ones) consolidate the most active, advanced companies and act as collective representatives of their interests. For this reason, business associations can be regarded as interface units between the authorities and businesses and as a possible instrument for promotion of economic development.

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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 16.

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Date of creation: Oct 2011
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Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:16-11
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  1. Nauro F. Campos & Francesco Giovannoni, 2006. "Lobbying, Corruption and Political Influence," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 06-14, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
  2. Rodrik, Dani, 2004. "Industrial Policy for the Twenty-First Century," Working Paper Series rwp04-047, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Yakovlev, Andrei, 2011. "State-business relations in Russia in the 2000s: From the capture model to a variety of exchange models?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 10/2011, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  4. Hausmann, Ricardo & Rodrik, Dani & Sabel, Charles F., 2008. "Reconfiguring Industrial Policy: A Framework with an Application to South Africa," Working Paper Series rwp08-031, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  5. Andrei Yakovlev & Yuri Simachev & Yuri Danilov, 2010. "The Russian corporation: patterns of behaviour during the crisis," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 129-140.
  6. Jac C. Heckelman, 2007. "Explaining the Rain: The Rise and Decline of Nations after 25 Years," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(1), pages 18-33, July.
  7. repec:cas:wpaper:wp13_2007_14 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. William Pyle, 2007. "Organized Business, Political Regimes and Property Rights across the Russian Federation," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0703, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  9. A. Yakovlev., 2007. "The Russian Corporation and Regional Governments: Models of Interrelations and Their Evolution," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 1.
  10. Doner Richard F. & Schneider Ben Ross, 2000. "Business Associations and Economic Development: Why Some Associations Contribute More Than Others," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(3), pages 1-29, December.
  11. Pyle, William, 2007. "Organized business, political regimes and property rights across the Russian Federation," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2007, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  12. Coates, Dennis & Heckelman, Jac C, 2003. " Interest Groups and Investment: A Further Test of the Olson Hypothesis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(3-4), pages 333-40, December.
  13. Avdasheva, Svetlana & Golikova, Victoria & Sugiura, Fumikazu & Yakovlev, Andrei, 2007. "External Relationship of Russian Corporations," Discussion Paper Series b37, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
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