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The Identification of Industrial Clusters – Methodical Aspects in a Multidimensional Framework for Cluster Identification

  • Mirko Titze
  • Matthias Brachert
  • Alexander Kubis

We use a combination of measures of spatial concentration, qualitative input-output analysis and innovation interaction matrices to identify the horizontal and vertical dimension of industrial clusters in Saxony in 2005. We describe the spatial allocation of the industrial clusters and show possibilities of vertical interaction of clusters based on intermediate goods flows. With the help of region and sector-specific knowledge interaction matrices we are able to show that a sole focus on intermediate goods flows limits the identification of innovative actors in industrial clusters, as knowledge flows and intermediate goods flows do not show any major overlaps.

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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 14.

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Date of creation: Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:14-10
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  1. Mirko Titze & Matthias Brachert & Alexander Kubis, 2008. "The Identification of Regional Industrial Clusters Using Qualitative Input-Output Analysis," IWH Discussion Papers 13, Halle Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Anders Malmberg & Dominic Power, 2005. "(How) Do (Firms in) Clusters Create Knowledge?," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 409-431.
  3. Ron Boschma & Anne L. J. ter Wal, 2007. "Knowledge Networks and Innovative Performance in an Industrial District: The Case of a Footwear District in the South of Italy," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 177-199.
  4. Martin Rosenfeld & Peter Franz & Gerhard Heimpold, 2007. "Economic 'Clusters' in East Germany: Evidence on the Location and Characteristics of Spatially Concentrated Industries," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 73-92.
  5. J. Knoben, 2009. "Localized inter-organizational linkages, agglomeration effects, and the innovative performance of firms," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 757-779, September.
  6. Edward Feser & Edward Bergman, 2000. "National Industry Cluster Templates: A Framework for Applied Regional Cluster Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 1-19.
  7. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2002. "Deconstructing Clusters: Chaotic Concept or Policy Panacea," ESRC Centre for Business Research - Working Papers wp244, ESRC Centre for Business Research.
  8. Gregory Spencer & Tara Vinodrai & Meric Gertler & David Wolfe, 2010. "Do Clusters Make a Difference? Defining and Assessing their Economic Performance," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(6), pages 697-715.
  9. Braunerhjelm, Pontus & Carlsson, Bo, 1999. " Industry Clusters in Ohio and Sweden, 1975-1995," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 279-93, June.
  10. Maskell, Peter & Malmberg, Anders, 1999. "Localised Learning and Industrial Competitiveness," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(2), pages 167-85, March.
  11. Jan Oosterhaven & Gerard Eding & Dirk Stelder, 2001. "Clusters, Linkages and Interregional Spillovers: Methodology and Policy Implications for the Two Dutch Mainports and the Rural North," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 809-822.
  12. Anders Malmberg & Peter Maskell, 2002. "The elusive concept of localization economies: towards a knowledge-based theory of spatial clustering," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 34(3), pages 429-449, March.
  13. Sara Cruz & Aurora Teixeira, 2010. "The Evolution of the Cluster Literature: Shedding Light on the Regional Studies-Regional Science Debate," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(9), pages 1263-1288.
  14. Arundel, Anthony & Kabla, Isabelle, 1998. "What percentage of innovations are patented? empirical estimates for European firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 127-141, June.
  15. Baptista, Rui & Swann, Peter, 1998. "Do firms in clusters innovate more?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 525-540, September.
  16. Rolf Sternberg & Timo Litzenberger, 2004. "Regional clusters in Germany--their geography and their relevance for entrepreneurial activities," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(6), pages 767-791, September.
  17. Harald Bathelt & Andersand Malmberg & Peter Maskell, 2002. "Clusters and Knowledge Local Buzz, Global Pipelines and the Process of Knowledge Creation," DRUID Working Papers 02-12, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  18. Edward M. Bergman & Edward J. Feser, . "Industrial and regional Clusters: Concepts and Comparative Applications," Wholbk, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University, number 19 edited by Randall Jackson, October.
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