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The Identification of Regional Industrial Clusters Using Qualitative Input-Output Analysis

  • Mirko Titze
  • Matthias Brachert
  • Alexander Kubis

The ‘cluster theory’ has become one of the main concepts promoting regional competitiveness, innovation, and growth. As most studies focus on measures of concentration of one industrial branch in order to identify regional clusters, the appropriate analysis of specific vertical relations within a value-adding chain is developing in this discussion. This paper tries to identify interrelated sectors via national input-output tables with the help of Minimal Flow Analysis by Schnabl (1994). The regionalization of these national industry templates is carried out with the allocation of branch-specific production values on regional employment. As a result, the paper shows concentrations of vertical clusters in only 27 of 439 German NUTS-3 regions.

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Paper provided by Halle Institute for Economic Research in its series IWH Discussion Papers with number 13.

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Date of creation: Nov 2008
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Handle: RePEc:iwh:dispap:13-08
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  1. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2002. "Deconstructing Clusters: Chaotic Concept or Policy Panacea," ESRC Centre for Business Research - Working Papers wp244, ESRC Centre for Business Research.
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  11. Anders Larsson, 2002. "The development and regional significance of the automotive industry: supplier parks in western Europe," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 767-784, December.
  12. Jan Oosterhaven & Gerard Eding & Dirk Stelder, 2001. "Clusters, Linkages and Interregional Spillovers: Methodology and Policy Implications for the Two Dutch Mainports and the Rural North," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 809-822.
  13. Steinle, Claus & Schiele, Holger, 2002. "When do industries cluster?: A proposal on how to assess an industry's propensity to concentrate at a single region or nation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 849-858, August.
  14. Kelton, Christina M.L. & Pasquale, Margaret K. & Rebelein, Robert P., . "Using NAICS to Identify National Industry Cluster Templates for Applied Regional Analysis," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 88, Vassar College Department of Economics.
  15. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1996. "R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 630-40, June.
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  17. Edward Feser & Edward Bergman, 2000. "National Industry Cluster Templates: A Framework for Applied Regional Cluster Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 1-19.
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