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Short and long run determinants of brain drain : Evidence from Pakistan

  • Mohamed Arouri
  • Yahya Rashid
  • Muhammad Shahbaz
  • Frédéric Teulon

This paper contributes to the literature by determining macroeconomic drivers of brain drain in case of Pakistan over the period of 1972-2012 using the ARDL bounds testing approach. Our findings show that economic growth and financial development have negative impact on brain drain. However, inflation, unemployment and trade openness aggravate brain drain. This study highlights macroeconomic insights for policy makers to control brain drain problem in Pakistan.

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Paper provided by Department of Research, Ipag Business School in its series Working Papers with number 2014-113.

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Length: 13 pages
Date of creation: 25 Feb 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ipg:wpaper:2014-113
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  1. Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2012. "Does trade openness affect long run growth? Cointegration, causality and forecast error variance decomposition tests for Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2325-2339.
  2. Baldwin, Richard & Forslid, Rikard, 1996. "Trade Liberalization and Endogenous Growth: A q-Theory Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 1397, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Frederic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Globalization, brain drain and development," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1108, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Maurice Obstfeld, 1992. "Risk-taking, global diversification, and growth," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 61, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  5. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "The saving and investment nexus for China: evidence from cointegration tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 1979-1990.
  6. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
  7. Berry, R Albert & Soligo, Ronald, 1969. "Some Welfare Aspects of International Migration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 778-94, Sept./Oct.
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