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Is environmentally-induced income variability a driver of migration? A macroeconomic perspective

  • Luca Marchiori
  • Jean-Francois Maystadt
  • Ingmar Schumacher

It was recently suggested that the role of environmentally-induced income variability as a determinant of migration has been studied little to none. We provide a theoretical discussion and an overview of the empirical literature on this. We also extend a previous empirical study of ours by including income variability. Our findings lead us to acknowledge that income variability is a negligible driver of migration decisions at the macroeconomic level.

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Paper provided by Department of Research, Ipag Business School in its series Working Papers with number 2013-017.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 17 May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ipg:wpaper:2013-017
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