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Migration and Pension

Author

Listed:
  • Efraim Sadka
  • Assaf Razin

Abstract

Migrants, being relatively low earners, are net beneficiaries of the welfare state. However, this paper uses a dynamic model to show that because of migrants’ positive influence on the pension system, which is an important pillar of any welfare state, migration could be beneficial to all income (high and low) and age (old and young) groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Efraim Sadka & Assaf Razin, 1998. "Migration and Pension," IMF Working Papers 98/165, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:98/165
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    2. Peter S. Heller, 1998. "Rethinking Public Pension Reform Initiatives," IMF Working Papers 98/61, International Monetary Fund.
    3. David E. Wildasin, 1994. "Income Redistribution and Migration," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 637-656, August.
    4. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1995. "Resisting Migration: Wage Rigidity and Income Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 312-316, May.
    5. Richard Hemming, 1998. "Should Public Pensions be Funded?," IMF Working Papers 98/35, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karin Mayr, 2003. "Immigration and Majority Voting on Income Redistriubtion-Is there a Case for Opposition from Natives?," Economics working papers 2003-08, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Mariangela Bonasia & Rita De Siano, 2016. "Population Dynamics and Regional Social Security Sustainability in Italy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(1), pages 124-136, January.
    3. Vladimir Gligorov & Rostislav Kapelyushnikov & Andrei Kuznetsov & Leon Podkaminer, 2006. "Monthly Report No. 8-9/2006," wiiw Monthly Reports 2006-08-09, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim & Swagel, Phillip, 2002. "Tax burden and migration: a political economy theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 167-190, August.
    5. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 869-924, December.
    6. Tim Krieger, 2001. "Intergenerational Redistribution and Labor Mobility: A Survey," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 58(3), pages 339-339, July.
    7. Phillip L Swagel & Efraim Sadka & Assaf Razin, 2002. "The Aging of the Population and the Size of the Welfare State," IMF Working Papers 02/68, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Gligorov, Vladimir, 2009. "Mobility and Transition in Integrating Europe," MPRA Paper 19198, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Facchini, Giovanni & Mayda, Anna Maria & Mishra, Prachi, 2011. "Do interest groups affect US immigration policy?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 114-128, September.
    10. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka & Phillip Swagel, 2002. "The Aging Population and the Size of the Welfare State," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(4), pages 900-918, August.
    11. Casarico, Alessandra & Devillanova, Carlo, 2003. "Social security and migration with endogenous skill upgrading," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 773-797, March.
    12. Sapir, André, 2000. "Who is Afraid of Globalization? The Challenge of Domestic Adjustment in Europe and America," CEPR Discussion Papers 2595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pensions; Low Skilled Migrants; Pay-As-You-Go Pension; Heterogenous Population; Overlapping Generations; migration; pension; pension system; pension benefit; retirement;

    JEL classification:

    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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