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Does the Long-Run Ppp Hypothesis Hold for Africa? Evidence From Panel Co-Integration Study

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  • Jun Nagayasu

Abstract

This paper addresses whether parallel market exchange rates in Africa behave in the long run in a manner consistent with the purchasing power parity (PPP) hypothesis. A recent econometric method, the panel co-integration test, enables us to examine the long-run PPP hypothesis by pooling the time-series data of several countries. This approach is particularly useful when analyzing African countries, which often do not have long time series. Using pooled data for 16 African countries, the study concludes that the behavior of parallel market exchange rates in Africa is consistent with the long-run PPP hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Jun Nagayasu, 1998. "Does the Long-Run Ppp Hypothesis Hold for Africa? Evidence From Panel Co-Integration Study," IMF Working Papers 98/123, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:98/123
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    Cited by:

    1. Venus Khim-Sen Liew, 2003. "The Validity of PPP Revisited: An Application of Non-linear Unit Root Test," International Finance 0308001, EconWPA.
    2. Jean-Francois Hoarau, 2010. "Does long-run purchasing power parity hold in Eastern and Southern African countries? Evidence from panel data stationary tests with multiple structural breaks," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 307-315.
    3. Ronald MacDonald & Jun Nagayasu, 2000. "The Long-Run Relationship Between Real Exchange Rates and Real Interest Rate Differentials: A Panel Study," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(1), pages 1-5.
    4. Imed Drine & Christophe Rault, 2008. "Purchasing Power Parity For Developing And Developed Countries. What Can We Learn From Non-Stationary Panel Data Models?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(4), pages 752-773, September.
    5. Kargbo, Joseph M., 2003. "Cointegration Tests of Purchasing Power Parity in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1673-1685, October.
    6. Arize, Augustine C. & Malindretos, John & Nam, Kiseok, 2010. "Cointegration, dynamic structure, and the validity of purchasing power parity in African countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 755-768, October.
    7. Yihui Lan, 2003. "The Long-Term Behaviour of Exchange Rates, Part III: The Explosion of Purchasing Power Parity," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 03-07, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    8. Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah & Liew Khim Sen & Lim Kian Ping, 2003. "Exchange Rates Forecasting Model: An Alternative Estimation Procedure," International Finance 0307005, EconWPA.
    9. Joseph M. Kargbo, 2004. "Purchasing Power Parity And Exchange Rate Policy Reforms In Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(2), pages 258-281, June.
    10. Arize, Augustine C. & Malindretos, John & Ghosh, Dilip, 2015. "Purchasing power parity-symmetry and proportionality: Evidence from 116 countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 69-85.
    11. Joseph Kargbo, 2006. "Purchasing Power Parity and real exchange rate behaviour in Africa," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1-2), pages 169-183.
    12. Chien-Fu Chen & Chien-an Andy Wang & Chung-Hua Shen, 2007. "Does PPP hold for Big Mac price or consumer price index? Evidence from panel cointegration," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(16), pages 1-15.
    13. K. Hassanain, 2004. "Purchasing Power Parity And Cross-Sectional Dependency," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(2), pages 238-257, June.
    14. Yihui Lan, 2001. "The Explosion of Purchasing Power Parity," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 01-22, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    15. Liew Khim Sen & Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah, 2003. "How Well the Ringgit-Yen Rate Fits the Non-linear Smooth Transition Autoregressive and Linear Autoregressive Models," GE, Growth, Math methods 0307004, EconWPA.
    16. Mkenda, Beatrice Kalinda, 2001. "An Empirical Test of Purchasing Power Parity in Selected African Countries - a Panel Data Approach," Working Papers in Economics 39, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    17. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:6:y:2007:i:16:p:1-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Tsangyao Chang & Hsu-Ling Chang & Hsiao-Ping Chu & Chi-Wei Su, 2006. "Does PPP hold in African countries? Further evidence based on a highly dynamic non-linear (logistic) unit root test," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(20), pages 2453-2459.
    19. Imed Drine & Christophe Rault, 2003. "A re-examination of the Purchasing Power Parity using non-stationary dynamic panel methods : a comparative approach for developing and developed countries," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2003-570, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    20. Joseph Kargbo, 2003. "Food prices and long-run purchasing power parity in Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 321-336.
    21. Angelos Kanas, 2009. "Real exchange rates and developing countries," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 280-299.
    22. Azali, M. & Habibullah, M. S. & Baharumshah, A. Z., 2001. "Does PPP hold between Asian and Japanese economies? Evidence using panel unit root and panel cointegration," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 35-50, January.

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