IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Labor Market Adjustment in Canada and the United States


  • Alun H. Thomas
  • Eswar S Prasad


This paper provides a quantitative assessment of the relative importance of different labor market adjustment mechanisms in Canada and the United States and also examines the effects of the unemployment insurance (UI) system on labor market adjustment. At the aggregate level, employment growth shocks result in similar unemployment rate responses but smaller wage responses in Canada relative to the United States. Although overall UI generosity has increased aggregate unemployment persistence in Canada, the endogenous component of UI has affected unemployment persistence only marginally. The lower degree of aggregate real wage flexibility in Canada has not been an important determinant of unemployment persistence.

Suggested Citation

  • Alun H. Thomas & Eswar S Prasad, 1997. "Labor Market Adjustment in Canada and the United States," IMF Working Papers 97/2, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/2

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chan G. Huh & Bharat Trehan, 1995. "Modeling the time-series behavior of the aggregate wage rate," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 3-13.
    2. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
    3. David Card & W. Craig Riddell, 1993. "A Comparative Analysis of Unemployment in Canada and the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 149-190 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Robert A. Amano & R. Tiff Macklem, 1998. "Unemployment Persistence and Costly Adjustment of Labour: A Canada-US Comparison," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 24(s1), pages 138-151, February.
    5. Katharine G. Abraham & John C. Haltiwanger, 1995. "Real Wages and the Business Cycle," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 1215-1264, September.
    6. Miles Corak & Stephen R. G. Jones, 1995. "The Persistence of Unemployment: How Important Were Regional Extended Unemployment Insurance Benefits?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 555-567, August.
    7. Andolfatto, David & Gomme, Paul, 1996. "Unemployment insurance and labor-market activity in Canada," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 47-82, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Eswar Prasad & Alun Thomas, 1998. "A disaggregated analysis of employment growth fluctuations in Canada," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 26(3), pages 274-287, September.
    2. Mario Lefebvre, 1997. "Les marchés du travail régionaux : une comparaison entre le Canada et les États-Unis," Staff Working Papers 97-17, Bank of Canada.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow) or (Hassan Zaidi). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.