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Vertical Tax Externalities in the Theory of Fiscal Federalism

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  • Michael Keen

Abstract

Vertical tax externalities between levels of government can occur in federal structures, with responses to the tax policies of one level of government affecting the tax base of the other. Such effects mostly arise when federal and state governments co-occupy the same tax base. This paper examines these externalities by considering their implications for a range of issues in fiscal federalism: the relationship between state and federal tax rates, the equilibrium levels of these taxes, the relevance of experience in federal countries for policy design in international settings, intergovernmental grants, and the assignment of tax powers among levels of government.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Keen, 1997. "Vertical Tax Externalities in the Theory of Fiscal Federalism," IMF Working Papers 97/173, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wildasin, David E., 1989. "Interjurisdictional capital mobility: Fiscal externality and a corrective subsidy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 193-212, March.
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    6. Dahlby, Bev & Wilson, Leonard S., 2003. "Vertical fiscal externalities in a federation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 917-930, May.
    7. Richard C. Cornes & Emilson C.D. Silva, 1996. "Transfers Between Jurisdictions with Private Information: The Equity/Efficiency Tradeoff," Keele Department of Economics Discussion Papers (1995-2001) 96/12, Department of Economics, Keele University.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; Tax policy; federal tax; state tax; taxation; tax base; tax rates;

    JEL classification:

    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • H7 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation

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