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Stylized Facts of Government Finance in the G-7


  • Riccardo Fiorito


The stylized facts of government finance in the Group of Seven (G-7) industrial countries show that revenues lag real GDP procyclically, while government spending in most cases fails to lead the economy procyclically. This finding is not confined to transfers but also applies to the wage component of government consumption as well as, in most cases, to government fixed investment. Government deficits are always countercyclical but there is little evidence that stabilization is equally successful in stimulating the economy before shocks materialize.

Suggested Citation

  • Riccardo Fiorito, 1997. "Stylized Facts of Government Finance in the G-7," IMF Working Papers 97/142, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/142

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    Cited by:

    1. Ernesto Talvi & Carlos A. Vegh, 2000. "Tax Base Variability and Procyclical Fiscal Policy," NBER Working Papers 7499, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. António Afonso & Luca Agnello & Davide Furceri, 2010. "Fiscal policy responsiveness, persistence, and discretion," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(3), pages 503-530, December.
    3. Syed Ammad & Sabihuddin Butt & Shaista Alam, 2012. "Fiscal Responsiveness, Persistence and Discretion: A Case Study of Pakistan," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 15(45), pages 227-244, September.
    4. Fabrizio Coricelli, 2005. "Design and Implementation of the Stability and Growth Pact: The Perspective of New Member States," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0304, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Fabrizio Coricelli & Riccardo Fiorito, 2013. "Myths and Facts about Fiscal Discretion: A New Measure of Discretionary Expenditure," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13033, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    6. Abbott, Andrew & Jones, Philip, 2012. "Intergovernmental transfers and procyclical public spending," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(3), pages 447-451.
    7. Martin Guzman, 2009. "On the behavior of fiscal policy with costly expectations," Económica, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, vol. 0, pages 29-44, January-D.
    8. Strawczynski, Michel & Zeira, Joseph, 2009. "Cyclicality of Fiscal Policy: Permanent and Transitory Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 7271, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Michel Strawczynski & Joseph Zeira, 2013. "Procyclicality of Fiscal Policy in Emerging Countries: The Cycle is the Trend," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Luis Felipe Céspedes & Jordi Galí (ed.), Fiscal Policy and Macroeconomic Performance, edition 1, volume 17, chapter 11, pages 427-466 Central Bank of Chile.
    10. Aghion, Philippe & Hemous, David & Kharroubi, Enisse, 2009. "Credit Constraints, Cyclical Fiscal Policy and Industry Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 7359, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Young Lee & Changyong Rhee & Taeyoon Sung, 2006. "Fiscal policy in Korea: Before and after the financial crisis," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 13(4), pages 509-531, August.
    12. Gabriela Inchauste & Bernardin Akitoby & Benedict J. Clements & Sanjeev Gupta, 2004. "The Cyclical and Long-Term Behavior of Government Expenditures in Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 04/202, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Akitoby, Bernardin & Clements, Benedict & Gupta, Sanjeev & Inchauste, Gabriela, 2006. "Public spending, voracity, and Wagner's law in developing countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 908-924, December.

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