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Implications for Savings of Aging in the Asian “Tigers”

Author

Listed:
  • Steven A. Symansky
  • Peter S. Heller

Abstract

Significant aging is projected for many high-saving emerging economies of East and Southeast Asia. By 2025, the share of the elderly in their populations will at least double in most of these countries. The share of the young will fall. Aging populations could adversely affect saving rates in these economies, particularly after 2025. For the world, one may observe that, initially, the Asian Tigers could become increasingly important for world savings, reflecting their increased weight in the world economy, their high saving and growth rates, and the aging of the industrial countries. After 2025, the aging of the Tigers may reinforce the tendency toward a declining world saving rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven A. Symansky & Peter S. Heller, 1997. "Implications for Savings of Aging in the Asian “Tigers”," IMF Working Papers 97/136, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/136
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    Cited by:

    1. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2006. "China's Growth to 2030: Demographic Change and the Labour Supply Constraint," PGDA Working Papers 1106, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    2. Heller, Peter S., 1999. "Aging in Asia: Challenges for fiscal policy," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 37-63.
    3. M. Wakabayashi & F.L. MacKellar, 1999. "Demographic Trends and Household Saving in China," Working Papers ir99057, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    4. Shiyu Li & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Shuanglin Lin & Wing Thye Woo & Yunyun Jiang, 2016. "How Much Will China Save? Projecting China's National Savings Through 2040," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 255-274, September.
    5. Kevin C Cheng, 2003. "Economic Implications of China's Demographics in the 21st Century," IMF Working Papers 03/29, International Monetary Fund.
    6. John Janssen, 2002. "Long-term fiscal projections and their relationship with the intertemporal budget constraint: An application to New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/05, New Zealand Treasury.
    7. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2006. "China's Growth to 2030: The Roles of Demographic Change and Investment Risk," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-461, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    8. F. Gerard Adams & Byron Gangnes, 2000. "Will Japan's Current Account Turn to Deficit?," Working Papers 200010, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    9. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2006. "China's Growth to 2030: The Roles of Demographic Change and Investment Premia," PGDA Working Papers 1206, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    10. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley & Bu Yongxiang & Ian Bain, 2006. "China's Economic Growth and its Real Exchange Rate," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-476, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    11. repec:kap:iaecre:v:12:y:2006:i:3:p:374-381 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2006. "Demographic Change and the Labour Supply Constraint," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-467, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

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